Piper Crash at Embry Riddle: How Should Piper Owners React?

Please note the update on the article about the Piper PA-28R-201 that crashed at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
You can read the NTSB report there, and there is a link to download the NTSB's full-length PDFs also.

Also see Scott Sherer's letter on the topic here.

Topics of note in these articles: The NTSB is looking back at ADs and Service Bulletins from years ago, concerning similar situations. Read more in their article linked-to above.

Your Turn

Do you have a PA-28 and if so, does this concern you? What do you plan to do next?

If you don't have a PA-28 does this still concern you? What do you plan to do next?


Digital Product Manager
Piper Owner Society

Comments

  • I do have a PA-34-220T with around 5700 TT. I think i'll inspect the wings even if the plane only have 300 hours of training on it.
    But my school in FL does have a PA-28R-201T with only primary training since a long time so I'll definitely not fly this plane anymore until further inspections.....

  • Good judgement on your part. I'm doing the same thing here with my plane. Safe flying.

    Scott Sherer
    FAA Master Pilot
    Piper Owner Society Forum Moderator and Pipers Author.
    Need help? Let me know!

  • Thank you for the enlightening article and for sharing your perspective. I own a 1969 PA28R-200 with 6800 hours TT. It was used as a trainer for its first year (700 hours), but has been used much less in the years since then. I am indeed concerned about fatigue and as you suggest, at the next annual (October), will have the wing attach bolts inspected via eddy current testing whether there is an AD or not. My hope is that if the FAA does issue an AD, they will be reasonable in terms of recurring & costly inspections.

  • Roger that! Thanks for your comments, Matt.

    Scott Sherer
    FAA Master Pilot
    Piper Owner Society Forum Moderator and Pipers Author.
    Need help? Let me know!

  • So, my aircraft has 5300 hours total time, and was used for primary
    training in the past (I can tell that from the maintenance paperwork in
    the records binder). Given the above information, and the fact that I have
    it in for annual right now, I'm wondering if we should go ahead and do the
    inspection of the wing attach bolts via eddy current testing, as mentioned
    in the article.

    Your thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Kelly

    Scott Sherer
    FAA Master Pilot
    Piper Owner Society Forum Moderator and Pipers Author.
    Need help? Let me know!

  • elly,

    Yes I saw an advanced copy of his article. A couple things, first off
    cracks have been found in Piper Arrows but the Warrior is much lighter, has
    less power and isn't a retractable landing gear airplane. While very
    similar in design, these are important differences.

    Next, until the AD is issued there aren't any specs or criteria to follow
    to do an inspection. We would have no idea how to do the test, who could
    do the test (there are different levels of NDT certifications), what would
    be acceptable, and what wouldn't be acceptable. If we performed a test and
    any part of the test differed from the AD we'd have to do the work all
    over again to meet the criteria in the AD.

    Removing bolts just to check would likely cause more damage than good
    until it is known what will be called out.

    We can do a good visual on the attach points, but beyond that we advise
    everyone to wait and see what happens in terms of what the FAA comes up
    with. The FAA was just out this morning on an unrelated matter and we
    asked them a few questions about the situation, and they concur with our
    thoughts at this point.

    Its very unlikely your airplane has any cracks, I wouldn't loose any sleep
    over it at this time.

    ~Erich Rempert

    Scott Sherer
    FAA Master Pilot
    Piper Owner Society Forum Moderator and Pipers Author.
    Need help? Let me know!

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